Twilight

The Twilight saga was an overnight phenomenon of sorts created by the author Stephanie Meyer and found its way into the majority of female hands. Although the story is fictional with a subject matter between romance of a werewolf and vampire with a human girl, the book contains quite a bit of subject matter that leaves the readers questioning whether some ethical lines were crossed.

In the book the minority of the Twilight universe is Jacob Black. He is an American Indian who lives on a reservation with a disabled father and is portrayed with minimal income. American Indians are constantly at war with the media, whether it be against cultural misappropriation or stereotyping. For such a popular piece of literature amongst young people Meyer did a poor job of attempting to paint an accurate picture of a modern day American Indian and his family.
Another issue with the Twilight saga is how Bella is portrayed as a fragile female interested solely in males. Bella is rarely placed in a classroom with the worries of a high school student. Such a portrayal of her character emphasizes how women are placed solely as characters and not in a more educated light.

Bella should’ve been portrayed as a more stronger woman with a less flaky airhead personality. Considering that she was the main character of the series and most influential Meyer should’ve made her more direct and less boy crazy. This also applies to the rest of the females associated with the book. The men overshadow the women and seem to be in control of every situation that the characters run into.

The fact that the book was turned into a film and marketed towards a large audience with inaccurate ethics further drives the point that media is not solely at fault for brainwashing the audience but more so that people are willing to submit themselves into an archaic insensitive way of thinking. It would’ve been a great feat had Meyer corrected her inaccuracies and made a point to shine a light on the troubles minorities face.

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